News

Reclaiming vs. Starting Anew

Recently, much has been said about the Resnick's decision to bulldoze a forest of old oak trees in Paso Robles, California.

(Click here to Read the story by the los angeles times)

This year, we planted our first vineyard here in the Finger Lakes.  When we were looking for land, Louis always would say we want “nude” land, meaning land that had already been cleared and was sitting dormant.  We found something close to that, which was a vineyard that had not been farmed since 1983.  Was it difficult to clear the old wires, posts and vines out?  Yes!  Wires left behind are a mechanical nightmare to deal with, and they love to tangle up in sprockets and break machinery - things were no different for us.  Would we do it differently?  Absolutely not.  I am really happy to be breathing life back into what was once a productive parcel of land, and having some local long-term economic impact as well.  It is the same great feeling one gets when renovating an old house, very rarely cheap, but certainly satisfying.

 
Rick and Alexandra are followed by Ajax, our trusty four-legged companion. The team is watching each vine enter the ground, making sure that they are each securely planted in the soil.

Rick and Alexandra are followed by Ajax, our trusty four-legged companion. The team is watching each vine enter the ground, making sure that they are each securely planted in the soil.

 

The Skinny on Eve's Cidery

Imagine a winery owner that isn’t talking about themselves for a moment…odd I know, but here I go.

If you like the wines of Forge Cellars then you should drink Eve’s Ciders.  Dry, crisp, focused with tons of interest and wait for it…TERROIR!!  They are really that amazing and I think ciders of this quality (go to the CiderHouse this weekend to explore all the great regional producers) are going to rattle the foundations of the sparkling wine/Champagne business in the U.S.


Think about it, for less than $20 you can get hand-crafted, traditional method cider (Champagne method – secondary fermentation in bottle to naturally create the bubbles) that was grown with the deepest respect for the land and that is made on a scale that makes you wonder how they can afford to do it.


Compare that to the industrial stuff you would tend to get in that price range and you will see why I am more than happy to give up the spotlight for a moment to give you the skinny on something that we (including the Frenchman) love to drink.

Read the most recent article from the New York Cork Report featuring Autumn Stoscheck of Eve’s Cidery.