rhone valley

Opposites

This year we are experiencing the wettest summer that I can recall.  I have never had a wet basement in our 200-year-old farmhouse during the summer months.  Just this past week, I had four inches of water down there--thankfully, it is a slate and dirt floor, so the water comes in and goes out without too much of an issue.  

The fun of having a “sister estate” is that we get to compare notes.  Louis sent me a picture this morning from Château de Saint Cosme in Gigondas (Rhône Valley), which was taken with a drone above the Roman chapel (the inspiration for the Saint Cosme label) that is at the top of the vineyards behind the winery.  He told me that they are having a hot and dry summer, but the vines seem to be doing okay.  The vines have to develop very deep roots in order to survive these hot months in the Rhône.  This is quite the opposite of Seneca Lake this summer, where we are handing out snorkels to the vineyard crews.

-RR

Checking in on Our Friends in Gigondas

clairette vines saint cosme

In the spring, we had the chance to plant Clairette vines in Gigondas at Château de Saint Cosme. We received a photo just the other day showing us how they are coming along.

Vines grow much slower at Saint Cosme! The Forge Cellars vines, planted (on Seneca Lake) in June are already nearly 36 inches tall. Amazing, the difference in vigor.

Below is the recap on planting in Gigondas that we sent out via email back in June.


Our Recent Trip to France
June 16, 2016

Each year the Forge Cellars team heads to Gigondas for at least a week for tasting, education and discussions with Louis and the Château de Saint Cosme team.  This year was magical as we hand planted a small vineyard at the estate of selection massale Clairette as a small experiment on the edge of the Hominis Fidis vineyard.

Small parcels must be hand planted.  This process uses your body weight to drive the spike into the ground. Elbow grease is required and then with a deft hand, you slip the vine into the hole as you remove the spike.  Training is required!

This technique requires the skill of a surgeon.  Though Laurent (red shirt) doesn’t speak much English, his guidance in French was enough to allow Phil Davis (vineyard liaison) to try his hand at this ancient technique.